(T)ex(t)ploiting a coursebook listening text

So this one is not a lesson as such but more an idea for your lessons.

Coursebooks are rich resources for texts and sadly, due to completely understandable constraints (space / industry traditions / overall themes of a book / editor pressure) they are very often under-used. Listening exercises tend to test comprehension or act as a vehicle for uncovering the target language. While this is a totally valid use of a listening text, I’ve often asked myself if perhaps we could be exploiting them further.

Recently a teacher came to me with a problem. She had finished her double page spread as per her plan, her students had really nailed the controller and freer practice and she had dealt with feedback. All in all, a perfect lesson. But, she had been left with 30 mins in the class so she has dragged out feedback a little and then let them start on some of their homework. She hadn’t really been satisfied with how the class had ended and wondered if I had any advice.

I suggested revisiting the listening text from earlier in the lesson. There is so much that can be done. What follows are just a few ideas that you should be able to apply to almost any listening text.

Reflection:

The idea here is to encourage sts to think about why they struggled (if they did) with comprehension. This can then inform what part of the text you examine. It also means learners don’t just blame their “bad listening”, there will always be something we can teach them that will improve things.

  • What percentage of this text do you feel you understood?
  • What did you find difficult about this listening?
  • What would help you to understand it better?

Pronunciation for listening skills:

The main idea is that if students don’t know it is possible, they won’t hear it. Consider “do you want to” versus /juhwanna/. We cannot expect a learner to know that they are the same. They do not expect written English to vary so drastically from spoken English. It is our job to highlight the differences, little and often.

  • Listen to the text with the transcript. Encourage sts to underline chunks that sound different to what they would expect.
  • Highlight one or two chunks in the text that sound different to the expected written form. Drill them, encourage sts to write personalised sentences and then drill them.
  • Highlight one feature of spoken English (schwa for articles / final consonant & initial vowel linking / stressed words at the end of a sentence or clause) and then encourage sts to listen for other examples within the text.

Speaking skills:

Very often coursebook texts will work on functional language for conversations but if you revisit the text, you may find something else that will help them with their speaking.

  • Give sts the transcript and ask them to mark a circle above words they think will be stressed (spoken clearly). Then listen and check. Examine which words tend to be stressed (info words: nouns/verbs/adj/adv)
  • Do the same but ask them to mark when the speaker pauses with a slash. Listen and check. Notice it tends to be at the end of a sentence, after a comma or after a linking word. This will help sts with the flow of spoken English.
  • Examine any fillers in the text. It might seem strange but the noises we make in one language can be very different to another. Take for example the Turkish /tch/ that simply means “no” but in English can signal a lack of respect or interest and can be quite offensive. It’s worth pointing these differences out.

Learner training:

What we really want are learners that can analyse texts by themselves, that notice chunks, that don’t really need us. If done little and often, these exercises can help create these super students.

  • Ask sts to underline any prepositions on the transcript. Notice what their function is. Are they linked to an adjective, are they part of a phrase, are they related to time or movement? Prepositions are so often overlooked but by drawing their attention to them in context we can avoid having to do lengthy preposition lessons.
  • Get sts to underline any interesting chunks in the text. Discuss the meaning, drill the pron and ask them to choose 2 that they will use in conversation that week. Remember to get them to think about how they will use it. They must plan the context. Make sure you follow up with them at the end of the week or they will never do it again.

So, just a few ways you could revisit your listening texts the next day or during the lesson. Just because the coursebook hasn’t had time to look at these, doesn’t mean you don’t. And remember, I don’t expect you to do all of these for every text. That would be insanity and you’d never get anything done.

The key is little and often!

So try some out and let us know how it goes.

The write stuff – CPD

So, this was a session that I did with some teachers at our school, EC, a few years back, it got great feedback at the time and I am constantly pleased to see that some of the ideas from it are still being used in our classrooms today.

If you have used many of the writing materials posted on the site you will probably recognise some of the ideas if not actual full exercises here.  The idea of the CPD was to try to get teachers thinking about teaching writing, and what that involves rather than just setting writing.  There is an accompanying booklet that goes with the CPD as I don’t think there is much point in giving teachers ideas without giving them a helping hand to put them into practice.  They are busy and often won’t have time to plan a lesson using the new ideas so anything that can be done to make it easier for them to implement ideas is a good thing in my book.

The procedure below is just a talk through the power point which you can download below.

The session format is more workshop than lecture, you need to give the teachers chance to discuss a few of the points.

Procedure:

Slide 2

  1. Discussion – The beginning is all about finding out what teachers do, some may have great practice already, doesn’t mean a refresher won’t help, some may not do so much, it is good to find out why.

1.1 Get them to check against the list on the screen, not all of them are good practice, in my opinion.  Now ask them to discuss why they do these things.

Slide 3

1.2 Answer reveal – this is how i would divide them, this may create discussion, which is the idea, but explain there is nothing wrong with any of the activities on the ‘No, something else’ side, but that they are not teaching writing.

Slide 4

2.1 The focus of this is to ask teachers why model answers are useful.  There is a whole lesson on this on the site.

https://textploitationtefl.wordpress.com/2015/07/26/model-answers/

Discussion – In pairs or groups ask them to discuss for maybe 5 minutes and then do a group feedback session.

The answers should be:

  • Can we assume that students will know what particular types of writing should look like?

No, task types can be different in different languages and writing types don’t necessarily translate

  • How does the student benefit from a model of the type of writing you are using?

They can see what you want them to produce, we all need this.  Also exposes them to the vocan and grammar that is appropriate for the type of writing and other features that make up register.

  • What happens when students aren’t given a model?

They don’t give you the piece of writing you want.  disappointed teacher, disappointed student, less motivation on both parts, downward spiral and so on etc.

Slide 5

This slide focuses on layout, again key in many styles of writing and something that is too often taken for granted.

3.1 Ask the teachers what styles of writing these are and how they know, ask if they think their students would know and why / why not?

Answers: letter – report – essay

What is the difference in layout? – letters have rules for how they are laid out – the report is normally divided into sections – essay features longer paragraphs etc

Why do students need to know these? – if they don’t, how will they write them?

Slide 6

Style and register – again this was looked at elsewhere, here in fact

https://textploitationtefl.wordpress.com/2015/06/10/how-can-i-write-it-if-i-dont-know-what-it-is/

4.1 Ask the teachers to briefy discuss the two questions on the slide and do whole group feedback

answers should include – you get inappropriate writing, or the styles are all mixed up. a very negative effect on the reader.

Slide 7

4.2 Show them the example and ask them what is wrong, for extra interactive work you could ask them to quickly rewrite a paragraph.

Obviously it is far too formal, but I am sure many of us have had a slightly less extreme version of this.  In my experience if shown this many students would be unable to say what was wrong and many might think it was very good.

Slide 8

Planning and editing

5.1 Ask the teachers to decide what other benefits of planning could be, maybe ask them to shout them out and then reveal.

Slide 9

Just acts as a reinforcement of importance of planning.  I find students who don’t plan have many mistakes in their first paragraph, normally as they have directly translated from their own language.  These can be lessened, if not eradicated, by planning in detail.

Slide 10

Lesson ideas, probably a good time to hand out the accompanying booklet, so they can see what each one is.

Materials:

As I said earlier, this was a session that we ran at our school, it was quite successful, feel free to use it and let us know how it goes, or feel free to adapt it and change bits around.